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by marc

Announcing the Elements “June 2014″ Update

June 19, 2014 in Oxygene, RemObjects C#

We are pleased to announce the new “June 2014” update to Oxygene and RemObjects C#.

“June 2014” is a small interim update for our Elements compiler that focuses mainly on improvements and bug fixes, but nonetheless brings — alongside over one hundred fixes — a handful of very significant new features and enhancements:

  • We’ve made major improvements to the WinRT and Windows Phone tool chains that will help you build apps for Microsoft’s modern app platforms. This includes support for new toolchain changes that come in Visual Studio 2013 Update 2 (which is a rather significant new release of VS, despite the incremental sounding name).

  • We’ve improved the Cocoa toolchain in significant ways, such as the ability for Elements to automatically pick your default Profile and Certificate when opening and building new iOS projects, and an improved UI that handles the case where you updated Xcode and need newer versions of the iOS or OS X SDKs — including the option to automatically download support for new SDKs, where available.

  • The new release has also been tested with the iOS 8.0 and OS X 10.10 Yosemite beta SDKs to make sure you’ll be able to import these SDKs and start working with the new features right away. (Unfortunately, we cannot ship pre-imported .fx files for these SDKs until they are out of beta and not under NDA anymore).

  • Cross Platform Compatibility Warnings have been improved for this release, with new warnings added and improved handling of these warnings inside conditionally compiled code, irrelevant warnings will, for example, now be suppressed in parts of the code that is clearly intended for a single platform based on $IFDEFs.

  • The code editor smarts have been improved, with automatic parenthesis and bracket completion, making it yet a bit more quicker to type your code on a day-by-day basis.

  • Finally, the June release of Elements integrates with our new Help Viewer app (currently available as separate download from the beta portal) to show you context sensitive help at the press of a button — not just from our Elements Wiki but also from the core platform docs off all our supported platforms — including the .NET Framework, the OS X and iOS SDKs, as well as the Java and Android SDKs.

And as always, this lists just the tip of the iceberg. Check out our full change log for details and more changes.

Also as always, the new release is a free update to all customers with an active subscription. If your subscription has lapsed, you can renew for $499 (single language) or $699 (to renew to both Oxygene and RemObjects C#).

New user licenses are available at $699 for both Oxygene or RemObjects C#, or $999 for both.

Happy Coding!

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by marc

Xcode 6, iOS 8, Yosemite, Swift, and You

June 4, 2014 in Data Abstract, Oxygene, RemObjects C#, WWDC

As you’ve probably heard by now, Apple release a whole lot of goodness for developers on Monday. As an Oxygene or RemObjects C# (or even a Data Abstract for Cocoa) developer, you’re probably asking yourself how these changes affect you.

Obviously, there’s a lot of things we cannot talk about yet — in part because it’s been less than two days since the new stuff was announced and we need to do a lot more research — and in part because many of the details are under NDA, and will remain so until Fall.

So, what can we say?

iOS 8 and OS X 10.10 Yosemite SDKs

The new SDKs import fine with the latest Gamma build of Elements that’s available to licensed users, and they will import fine with the imminent June release (based on that Gamma) that is coming later this week.

Why do you need a new build? Two reasons: We expected OS X 10.10 to not import with the previous version, simply because the internal integer versioning system Apple uses for OS X was reaching a conflict at 10.10 and our importer wouldn’t know how to calculate the right version code, until we looked at what Apple decided to do there. So that is broken “by design”. There were also a couple of small oddities in both 10.10 and 8.0 that our importer didn’t handle (basically, some Objective-C construct that was too weird for us to run into it sooner). Those had to be fixed.

In general (and moving forward) we aim for new Beta SDKs to import clean with current/previous Elements builds, w/o requiring action from us, of course.

Xcode 6

With the new SDKs imported, Oxygene and RemObjects C# work, as far as we can tell in our limited testing, fine against the new Xcode 6 command line tools, besides some issues with the Simulator APIs, which have changed pretty significantly in version 6.

If you run into any problems, remember that you can always change the version of Xcode that Elements sees back to Xcode 5.1, using the xcode-select tool, without needing to de-install Xcode 6. So you don’t need to hesitate about installing Xcode 6.

Of course we need to and will do more testing (especially on some of the areas with new features) to get Xcode 6 fully supported by the time it ships.

Swift

Of course the big announcement on Monday was Swift — Apple’s new programming language that’s destined to replace Objective-C in the long (or even short) run. It’s very exciting to see Apple take this step, which frankly I had been expecting – but not quite so soon, and not with such a drastic change in language style (Swift is *very different).

Swift opens up a lot of opportunities, but also challenges. On the one hand it “competes” with our Oxygene and RemObjects C# compilers for the spotlight of “more modern languages on Cocoa”, but on the other, it also opens developers up to the very idea that Cocoa does not have to mean Objective-C.

There’s also a lot of technical work for us to do. Swift does not compile to straight Cocoa objects, but brings its own object layer and APIs that Oxygene an RemObjects C# developers will want to interact with, and there’s work needed there — work that I can’t talk about in more detail, because much of Swift is covered by the Apple NDA until it is released. Of course we are fully committed to making this work, so that you can use code written in Swift as seamlessly from Elements as you can use the code written in Objective-C today.

If you’re a Data Abstract or RemObjects SDK for Cocoa developer, you’ll probably just want to use those libraries from Swift. This should just work out of the box, because Swift and Objective-C already mix and interact seamlessly in Xcode 6. Of course we’ll do a lot of testing on this front, see if maybe RO/DA can use some API revisions to make it work even better with Swift, and we’ll be providing project templates for Swift once Xcode 6 ships.

I will keep you updated as things develop. For now, I’ll let you get back to playing with the new toys!

Yours,
marc

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by marc

Announcing Elements 7.1

April 30, 2014 in Cocoa, Oxygene, RemObjects C#

Welcome back.

Hot on the heals of the brand new first release of RemObjects C# last month, we have just shipped the new 7.1 update to both RemObjects C# and our Oxygene language.

Despite the very short timeframe, 7.1 deserves the increased version moniker, as it includes — next to a huge amount of fixes, tweaks and improvements — several major new features that we’re very excited about.

Generics for Cocoa

You’ve asked and we listened, so version 7.1 brings full support for generic types to the Cocoa platform — for both Mac and iOS.

While 7.0 already allowed generics to be used on mapped types and provided generic variations of NSDictionary and NSArray, the new version now extends this to support generics on all types – including custom types derived from standard Cocoa classes such as NSObject or more concrete types. The sky is the limit.

Of course this feature is available in both the RemObjects C# and Oxygene languages, and I think this is yet another big step towards language parity between the platforms.

Colon operator, meet C#.

We just could not live without it ourselves, so we went ahead and implemented support for the ?. operator that’s rumored to be officially coming in C# 6.0 to our RemObjects C# dialect, ahead of time. The ?. is, essentially, what the colon (:) operator has been in Oxygene for ages: a way to safely call members of objects, whether the reference is null or not.

So you can now, for example, write if (myArray?.count > 0) and not care if myArray is null or not.

As in Oxygene, the ?. operator will convert the result into a nullable type, and RemObjects C# benefits from the full nullable arithmetic and ternary boolean logic as Oxygene when working with these types.

This means that if you mix nullable types in more complex expressions, the entire expression will become nullable. For example, myArray.count *5 could be null, 0, 5 or 10, depending on whether myArray is null.

We find that the ?. operator (and Oxygene’s colon one) comes in especially handy on the Cocoa platform, where calling members on null objects is second nature for developers coming from Objective-C. I’ve been porting a huge chunk of code from Objective-C to C# these past few weeks, and it’s been a lifesaver.

iOS 7.1 Support in the Box

Timing was not on our side when Apple shipped iOS 7.1 shortly after we shipped Elements 7 last month, and so manual import of the iOS 7.1 SDK was needed for anyone wanting to use RemObjects C# or Oxygene with the new SDK and the new Xcode 5.1. This new update — fittingly enough, given the version number — now includes support for iOS 7.1 in the box to make this easier. And we’re working on infrastructure to make these overlap periods less painful going forward, in time for iOS 8 and the next OS X release.

And there’s more

Further language and compiler enhancements include:

  • We’ve introduced a new [Category] aspect to make it easier to implement extension classes (i.e. “categories”, in Cocoa parlance) in RemObjects C# without the need for a special syntax (Oxygene, of course, has dedicated extension class syntax for this, but it can also use the new aspect).
  • We’ve extended Cross-Platform Compatibility Mode so that it now ignores the difference in case for the first letter of class called members, and ignores the case of namespaces in cross-platform code. This makes it a lot easier to deal with shared code on .NET (which prefers PascalCase) and Java or Cocoa (which prefer camelCase, and require lowercase namespaces).
  • We’ve added additional Fix-Its and Auto-Fixes.
  • We’ve added support for methods on records/structs on the Cocoa and Java platforms — yet another checkmark against language compatibility across all three targets, as .NET has had this feature from day one.
  • We’ve created new templates and added support for the ASP.NET Razor view engine.

Finally, for everyone downloading Oxygene or RemObjects C# fresh, we have also converted the “with Visual Studio” installers from .ISO files to embedded .exe installers to make them even easier to use.

What are you waiting for?

The new release is available now, and as always it is a free update for everyone with an active subscription. You can find it for download either in your Licensed Downloads area, as well as on the public Trials page. It (optionally) includes the Visual Studio 2013 IDE.

If your Oxygene subscription has lapsed, there has never been better time to renew than now to get both the new release, and everything we have planned for the the rest of the year (and beyond). Such as cough Fire cough. As always, you can renew your Oxygene license for a mere $499 per user. And we also have a special “up-renewal” that lets you renew Oxygene and add RemObjects C#, for only $699.

If your RemObjects C# subscription has lapsed, then, well, you’re a time traveller, and regular rules do not apply to you ;).

Prism

Also, for the very last time a reminder that if you are a Prism user, abandoned by Embarcadero, chances are you might be entitled to extended Oxygene for .NET releases from us, and/or qualify for special renewal or cross-grade pricing for both Oxygene and/or RemObjects C#. Check our Prism FAQ for details, or contact us if you have questions.

7.1

I’m very excited about this release. In many ways, it is what the 7.0 release we shipped in March should have been like. It received a ton of attention, testing and bug-fixing internally, and it’s probably the most solid release we ever shipped (only to be topped by what we have coming for May ;)..

I hope you enjoy it, too. Let me know what you think!

Yours,
marc hoffman
Chief Architect

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by marc

New Betas!

April 24, 2014 in Data Abstract, Oxygene, RemObjects C#

Hi everyone.

Over the past weekend, we shipped major new beta builds for, well, just about every single one of our products.

 

On the Elements front (Oxygene and RemObjects C#) we’ve also shipped the first beta for the May 2014 update, which will be a minor bug-fix update, but has a lot of significant improvements nonetheless. Check out the change log for details. (Of course, before that, the April update with version 7.1 is imminent and has been in gamma and locked down for a while; we expect that to ship as RTM this week.)

 

For our ROFX products, including Data Abstract and RemObjects SDK, I know that many of you are looking forward to the major new “DA8” (and RO8) release. Well, last week’s beta is the first publicly available beta off that development branch, and will give you a first peek at what’s coming in DA8. It’s far from feature complete, but there’s a lot of new and exciting stuff already there, from new features to support hosting Relativity in AWS, over better asynchronous APIs for Delphi and .NET (all the other, newer platforms already had pretty nice async APIs to begin with), to our all-new and very extensive PCTrade2 sample suite. From improved DA SQL client support in DA/Delphi, over Amazon DynamoDB Session Manager support, to our new Login Provider infrastructure. But there’s still more to come.

As part of the new DA8, we’ve also been doing a lot of “spring cleaning”, bringing the codebase (especially for the older and more mature products for Delphi and .NET) up wit the times, and removing some old cruft that as accumulated over the years as the frameworks evolved. Please refer to the change logs (available on beta.remobjects.com and in the Beta app), as well as the ROFX Beta forum on Talk for details.

Oh, I should mention that this beta also includes support for the just-released Delphi XE6, and the same goes for the new Hydra 4 gamma build that is available, as well.

We’ll be publishing more regular semi-weekly beta updates for ROFX (much like we always do for Elements) as we prepare for the first “DA8” release to launch officially in May.

We’re very excited about this next release, and the team has been very busy. We hope you’ll like what you’ll see — and please let us know in the comments, in the beta forum, or via email to info@.

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by marc

Using iOS 7.1 SDK with RemObjects C# or Oxygene

March 11, 2014 in Nougat, Oxygene

As you’ve probably seen, iOS 7.1 is out — and with it, a new SDK. Anxious to use iOS 7.1 with RemObjects C# or Oxygene? No problem. our Importing a New or Beta SDK for Use with Elements for Cocoa article on the wiki explains how to do it:

Launch FXGen by right-clicking CrossBox:

Once you have downloaded/updated to Xcode 5.1 from the App Store, find the Xcode.app in in your /Applications folder and drag it into the app:

Select iOS 7.1 from the dropdown:

Click “Start Import”

FXGen will run a for a short while, and then you have .fx files for the iOS 7.1 SDK you can use. Just copy them to the “C:\Program Files (x86)\RemObjects Software\Elements\Nougat\SDKs” folder in your PC or VM, and you’re off running.

Of course these same steps will also work for importing beta SDKs (which we won’t be able to tell you about, because of NDAs) – for example when Apple starts seeing iOS 8.0 or the next version of OS X later this year. This way, you can start working with the cool new stuff right away — without having to wait for anyone to create wrappers for you.

It goes without saying that now that iOS 7.1 is officially out, our next release (and Friday’s upcoming beta) will include the .fx files for iOS 7.1 out of the box.

Enjoy,
marc

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by marc

Announcing the Oxygene “January 2014″ Update

February 5, 2014 in Oxygene

Ahh, it feels like forever since i have written one of these, with the holidays and a long-overdue vacation in January. But it’s really just been a little over six weeks, and the time has come again:

Last friday, we shipped the latest update for Oxygene. The January 2014 release is a minor bugfix release for our 6.x compiler line, versioned as 6.1.61.1441. While it contains no major new features over what we shipped in November, it does have a wide range of fixes across all areas of the product, and is a recommended update for all users (of course ;)).

January 2014 also marks the last update for our 6.0 compiler line, and with that, the last release with Oxygene standing alone. We’re hard at work to finalize “Elements 7.0”, our next major release coming around the end of February – and with that release, not only does Oxygene get a major version bump again, it will also gain a sibling: our new Hydrogene language (which we’ll start talking a lot more about over the next few weeks).

But first things first: The January 2014 release is of course, as always, a free update for all users with an active subscription. You can find it for download in your Licensed Downloads area, as well as on the public Trials page. It (optionally) includes the still-new Visual Studio 2013 IDE.

If your subscription has lapsed, there has never been a better time to renew than now to get both the new release and everything we have planned for the next year (and beyond). As always, you can renew your Oxygene license for a mere $499 per user. And we also have a special “up-renewal” that lets you renew Oxygene and add Hydrogene, for only $699.

If you’re a Prism user, abandoned by Embarcadero, chances are you might be entitled to extended Oxygene for .NET releases from us. Check our Prism FAQ for details, or contact us if you have questions.

January 2014 is a great release – and we’re even more excited about what we have in store for you for the rest of the year. Let us know what you think!

Enjoy!

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by Scotty

Setting Up For Android Development with Oxygene

January 9, 2014 in Android, Cooper, Oxygene, Uncategorized, Visual Studio

The purpose of this article is to help you set up Oxygene ready to develop Android applications. It assumes you have already installed Oxygene, but will walk you through installing the Java and Android SDKs, as well as setting up a virtual Android device and configuring your physical device for development. If you have already been developing for Android using another platform or have already set these things up independently, you do not need to read this article.

Android is an operating system for devices such as mobile telephones and tablet computers developed by the Open Handset Alliance led by Google. Application development is focused on targeting the specialized Dalvik Virtual Machine (VM), which is a mobile-optimized VM similar to the Java VM. Oxygene ships with templates for creating Android projects, and produces both native Java JAR files and the Android APK file necessary for deployment to an Android device.

The Pre-Flight Check

Each time you create an Android project with Oxygene, it will do a ‘pre-flight check’ to ensure that it can locate the things it needs, notably the JDK and the Android SDK.

Java Pre-Flight Check

If you’ve installed them into custom locations and it fails to find them, this gives you an opportunity to specify the installation folders by selecting the “Manually Specify The JDK Path” link from the dialog.

Java SDK Paths

Java SDK

Oxygene requires version 6.0 or later of the Java Development Kit (JDK) to be installed. For Windows, we recommend installing the “x86″/”i586″ release of version 7 JDK.

If you have not yet installed the JDK, you can download it from here.

Installing the JDK simply involves downloading the installer and running it, accepting all the defaults.

Install JDK

Once the JDK is installed, click Retest on the Pre-Flight Check dialog. If all has gone well, the dialog should change to report that the Android SDK is missing.

Android SDK

To create Android applications, Oxygene requires the Android SDK to be installed, in addition to the JDK.

If the JDK is installed, but not the Android SDK, the Oxygene pre-flight check will report this.

Android Pre-Flight Check

Download The Android SDK

The Android SDK can be downloaded here.

For Windows, we recommend using the .exe installer available under the “SDK Tools Only” section that is displayed when you expand the “Download for Other Platforms” area of the SDK download page , as it will automatically register the Android SDK with the system so that Oxygene can find it.

Android SDK Download

NOTE: If you download the .zip version of the SDK and manually extract it, you will need to manually configure the path to the Android SDK in the IDE options, as described further down on this page.

NOTE: If the Android SDK installer complains that the JDK cannot be found, that may be because you have the x64 version of the JDK installed (see above). Simply install the x86 (i.e. 32-bit) as well to solve this problem.

Once you have downloaded the Android SDK Installer, run it and accept all the defaults.

Android SDK Installer

After installing the Android SDK, setup will automatically offer to launch the Android SDK Manager. Leave this checked.

Android SDK Installer Finished

The SDK Manager

In the SDK Manager, check to install the “Android SDK Platform-tools” and at least one API version (usually the newest) and click “Install Packages” to install.

Android SDK Manager

In the subsequent dialog you will need to accept any licenses that apply and press “Install” again.

Android SDK Manager License

You should periodically run the SDK Manager to check for any updates to the tools and platforms.

Android Virtual Devices

When the tools and platforms are all installed, you might want to create an Android emulator, also known as an Android Virtual Device or AVD. This will allow you to test your application, in case you don’t have an actual device (or don’t want to use your device for development).

AVD’s are created from the Android Virtual Device Manager, which is accessible from either the SDK Manager by choosing Tools – Manage AVDs or by starting the AVD Manager program directly or from the Oxygene Visual Studio tool bar.

Launch AVD Manager From Visual Studio

The AVD Manager

The first time you launch the AVD Manager there will be no configured AVD’s.

Android Virtual Device Manager

Create an AVD

To create a new AVD, click the “New” button. You will need to give the emulator a name. The AVD manager is pretty strict about what characters you can use in an AVD name, but will warn you when you use invalid characters.

Define a Device

The quickest way to set up an AVD is to emulate an actual device the DVD Manager already knows about. If you select the Device drop down, it will offer you a number of different Google devices it can emulate along with a set of generic devices.

AVD Device Selection

If one of these predefined devices match the type of device you are targeting, then simply select it from the list.

If none of the devices in the list match the device you wish to target, you can set up all the fields in the AVD manager manually. For a full list of settings check out the AVD Hardware Options Documentation.

Select an API

You will also need to select the API level for the Target field. You can choose any installed API level, for example Android 4.4 – API Level 19.

AVD Target Selection

Device Memory

When you choose a predefined device it will set the RAM setting for the AVD to match the actual device. In practice, this number may be too high to properly emulate and you could get a warning.

AVD Memory Warning

In this case, you will probably need to adjust the RAM setting to something more appropriate. (What’s appropriate will depend on the amount of memory in your development machine.)

Save The Device

Once the AVD is defined, click OK to save it. You will be shown a dialog confirming all the settings that will be used to create the AVD.

Save Setting Dialog

On clicking OK, the new AVD should now appear in the list of available AVD’s. If the AVD seems to be fully configured correctly, it will have a tick next to it in the list.

AVD in List

Test The Device

Once you have created an AVD, you can run it by selecting it in the list and clicking the “Start” button.

You will be presented with some launch options where you can simply click OK unless you need to change something.

AVD Launch Options

The AVD will then begin to start.

AVD Start Progress

After a few seconds, a blank emulator screen will appear. From this point, depending on the spec of your development machine, it could take several minutes for your device to appear in the emulator.

AVD In The Emualtor

Testing Your AVD Setup

Now you are ready to test your setup. Leave the device running. From within Oxygene, start a new Android Application Project.

New Android Project

This will create a very simple Android Template Application. Click the “Start” button on the Visual Studio tool bar and Oxygene will build your project and deploy it to the emulator where you should be able to see it running.

New Android Project Running In Emulator

Setting Up An Actual Device

AVD’s are great for testing your application on devices you don’t own. If you do however own a device, you can test your application right on the device itself. In many ways this is preferable to using an AVD, as you get to see exactly how it will run and perform.

Enable USB debugging on your device

Before you can debug an Android application on your device, you need to enable it for USB debugging.
On Android 4.0 and newer, you need to go into Developer Options and turn it on.

NOTE: On Android 4.2 and newer, Developer options are hidden by default. To make them available, go to Settings > About phone or Settings > About Tablet and tap Build Number seven times.

Once turned on (if necessary) you can find Developer options in Settings > Developer options.

Android 4.4 Developer Options

If your device is running Android 3.2 or older, you can find the Developer options under Settings > Applications > Development.

Install USB Drivers For the Device

In order to connect to an Android device to test your applications, you need to install the appropriate USB driver. This page on the Android Developers website provides links to the web sites for several original equipment manufacturers (OEMs), where you can download the appropriate USB driver for your device. However, this list is not exhaustive for all available Android-powered devices. The page also gives information on how to install the driver once you have it.

Running Your App On The Device

Once the USB driver is installed for your device, make sure the device is connected to your machine. From Oxygene you can then choose to debug your application on your device by selecting your device from the Crossbox area of the Visual Studio tool bar.

Select Android Device

The first time you run your application from within Oxygene on your device, a dialog will appear asking for permission.

You Are Ready To Go

That’s it. You are now set up and ready to begin developing Android applications using Oxygene.

Good Luck!

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by marc

Reminder: Get Oxygene for .NET as part of your RAD Studio SA

November 20, 2013 in Oxygene, Prism

Hi.

i just wanted to shoot out a reminder that if you purchased “Support & Maintenance”, a.k.a Software Assurance (SA) for RAD Studio XE3 from Embarcadero, you are entitled to updated releases of Oxygene for .NET for the duration of your SA period.

Embarcadero might be telling you (if they say anything at all, that is) that Prism is discontinued or dead, but nothing could be further from the truth.

Prism has always been just a rebranded version of our Oxygene for .NET product. And while Embarcadero might no longer be delivering it to you (in spite of happily taking your SA money), Oxygene is alive and well, of course, and we here at RemObjects have decided to honor the full SA periods and provide you with the latest updates to Oxygene for .NET for the duration of your SA period – on our own dime.

What do you need to do?

Two simple things:

  1. Register an existing XE3.2 (or XE3.1 or XE3, if you never received the others) serial number with us at remobjects.com/oxygene/registerserial.
  2. Contact us at sales@remobjects.com with details about your SA contract, most importantly its coverage period, and (if not obvious from your name or email address) the username you created in Step 1.

We’ll update your account with access to the latest release of Oxygene for .NET covered by your SA period (which may include future releases, too), and get back to you, ASAP.

Caveats

As i mentioned above, we’re doing this on our own dime, so we need to set some cut-off date, or else we’d be shipping free Oxygene to everyone, forever, and not be able to pay our salaries.

Our official cut-off date for the above offer is April 23, 2013. On that date, Embarcadero announced RAD Studio XE4, which officially no longer included Prism.

If you purchased RAD Studio XE3 with DA, or renewed SA for RAD Studio before that date, you qualify for the above deal. If you renewed after this date, your previous SA period has already been fully covered, and your new SA period is for XE4 and does not, i’m sorry to say, include Prism anymore.

That said, if you purchased or renewed RAD Studio SA after the above-mentions date and feel in any way that you were misled or that the lack of Prism in your new purchase was mis-represented (and i’m only bringing this scenario up because we had countless people contact us with that exact concern), please email us anyway, and we will try and find a fair solution.

Our #1 goal is that every Prism customer gets a fair deal and does not feel cheated out of the product they paid for.

Full Oxygene

If you don’t have SA, or your SA has expired, of course there’s always the option (and we’ll love you for it) of just going and renewing to the full Oxygene product from us.

Not only does this give you a fresh year of updates to Oxygene for .NET, but it also gives you access to the other two platform editions, letting you build fully native no-compromise apps for iOS, Mac, Android and Java.

And if your SA is still active (and/or extended via the above offer), renewing will add an extra year on top of your current SA period – essentially giving you more than a year of updates for all three platforms.

  • If you have an extended license with us: Renew for $499 to add a year of Oxygene for .NET, Cocoa and Java, on top.
  • If you don’t have a current/non-expired subscription: Cross-grade for $599 for a fresh year of updates.(You can also cross-grade if you own any version of Delphi or any past version of Prism.)

In Summary

We’re very excited about Oxygene, what we have done with it over the past year, and what we have planned moving forward. We’re also very thankful for your patronage, and we hope that you love working in Oxygene as much as we do (and as much as we love creating it), and we look forward to what 2014 will bring, with you on board.


Party Time!

Avatar of marc

by marc

Announcing the Oxygene “October 2013″ Update

November 4, 2013 in iOS, Nougat, Oxygene

Dear readers,

we may be a day late and into November with this announcement, but we’d like you to know that the “October 2013″ update for Oxygene has been made available earlier this week.

What’s New

The October update is mostly a bug-fix release, but it also includes a couple of rather significant new features on the Cocoa front.

Most importantly, this release officially introduced 64-bit ARM support for the Apple A7 chip in the new iPhone 5S and the new iPads that came out today. Last month we laid a lot of the groundwork with 64-bit compiler support, but now [you can build](http://wiki.oxygenelanguage.com/en/Architectures_(Cocoa) your apps for your devices in 64-bit mode, as well. Very exciting.

We have also started officially shipping .fx files for the new Mac OS X 10.9 “Mavericks”, and we’ve extended the Cocoa compiler to support the new “instancetype” feature introduced/mainstreamed for Objective-C by the iOS 7 and OS X Mavericks SDK.

And of course there are a good 100 additional fixes and improvements in this update, across all three platforms.

How to get Oxygene 6.1.57

As always, this release is a free update to all active subscribers, and can be downloaded now.

If your subscription has elapsed, now is a great time to renew to get access to the latest release and all the good stuff we have cooking for the near future.

Oxygene for Prism Customers

Remember that Oxygene 6.1 is also the first release that is no longer available from Embarcadero under the Prism brand, and it will not accept Prism XE3.2 serial numbers. But as a reminder: we are committed to honoring SA contracts Embarcadero might have sold you with the promise of Prism coverage (i.e. before April 23, 2013). Please email sales@remobjects.com with your SA details, and we’ll sort you out with ongoing access to Oxygene for .NET for the remainder of your SA period. (You can read more about this here).

Of course, if you do not have SA, or if you want to take advantage of Oxygene on the Cocoa and Java/Android platforms as well, you can always renew or cross-grade to the full Oxygene package at any time.

More to Come

2013 is drawing to a close, but we’re not done yet. We’ve got one whopper of a release planned for the end of this month (and lots of cool stuff are coming in 2014 as well). So make sure stay up to date with your subscription.

Happy coding!

Avatar of marc

by marc

“Steps” for iPhone 5S — written in Oxygene

October 30, 2013 in iOS, non-tech, Nougat, Oxygene


Steps

I’m more than thrilled to let you know about “Steps“, my next/new iOS app.

Steps is a small but helpful app, which works exclusively for the new iPhone 5S, because it uses the new M7 chip that Apple has introduced with the 5S to gather motion data and let you know how many steps you are taking each day.

Whether you’re interested in that to keep track of your daily workout, or just want a fun way to explore this cool new feature of your iPhone — Steps is a great way to do it.

On first launch, Steps gathers up to 7 days of previous walking history. That’s right — Steps (or rather, the M7 chip ;) has been hard at work for you even before you bought it! So you have some data to look at immediately.

In addition to showing your daily step count, Steps (new in version 1.1) also aggregates your average daily steps for the past week and month, and it will keep track of what your personal best has been, so far — including encouragement to beat it, when you get close.

Over time, and without you ever having to think about it again, Steps will update to load in more data as you roam about, all the while keeping track of your past history. Eventually, you’ll have months and months of walking data to look at. You don’t need to launch Steps manually for this to happen (although you will want to launch it to have a look once in a while).

And because it uses the new M7 chip, Steps can do all of this without affecting your iPhone’s battery life at all.

 

It goes without saying that Steps is written 100% in Oxygene for Cocoa. And as with all my previous Oxygene iOS projects, full source code is available on GitHub at github.com/dwarfland/Steps.

So, if you have your iPhone 5S yet, make sure to grab your copy of Steps on the App Store, for only 99c. And if you’re a developer, make sure to check out the code, as well!




Originally published on subspacecables.com.