You are browsing the archive for marc.

Avatar of marc

by marc

Heartbleed

April 14, 2014 in non-tech

Heartbleed

The Heartbleed vulnerability found in OpenSSL last week has everyone worried, and rightfully so. So of course we did an investigation and wanted to let you know the status of how Heartbleed has affected us and, by extension, you as our customers.

In short, it hasn’t, and everything should be safe.

Our servers run a combination of Windows Server, Linux, and even Mac OS X Server. Thankfully, we found none of our server software to be running OpenSSL versions that were affected by Heartbleed. On top, our customer-facing http://secure.remobjects.com website is running on Microsoft IIS (using ASP.NET and Oxygene) and thus not using OpenSSL to begin with. This is the site that all logins (including for direct website login, but also for Single-SignOn to services such as Talk, or for license downloads from within products) go through, as well as all payment information when you place orders. (On an unrelated note, we want to point out that we never store your payment information. It is passed through to the merchant as you place an order, but your credit card details are not retained by us.) We have received no information from our back-end merchant services provider to indicate they have been affected by Heartbleed.

Our Products are not directly affected by Heartbleed either. Only RemObjects SDK for Cocoa used OpenSSL under the hood until about two years ago, but the library was used only for purposes of the “AES Encryption Envelopes” feature, which does not cover the surface area of the Heartbleed exploit. In addition, RemObjects SDK for Cocoa was migrated away from OpenSSL to Apple’s CommonCrypto library about two years ago, so any applications built with recent versions of RO/Cocoa does not leverage OpenSSL at all.

Standalone RemObjects SDK or Data Abstract Servers implemented in .NET and running over HTTPS using Microsoft’s or Mono’s HTTPS base implementation (pretty much the standard/default if you are running a .NET based RO/DA server and did not go out of your way to hook up a custom SSL layer) are not affected by Heartbleed. Neither are applications hosted in Microsoft’s IIS web server and using Microsoft’s SSL/TLS stack.

That said, if you are deploying RemObjects SDK or Data Abstract servers via HTTPS, we still recommend that you review the parts of your tool stack that fall outside of RemObjects SDK and Data Abstract itself. For Example, Delphi’s Indy libraries optionally use OpenSSL to implement SSL/TLS functionality, so depending on what version of Indy you are using, and what version of OpenSSL you are using with it, your application might be affected by Heartbleed. The same may be the case if you are hosting RO/DA service applications on a web server such as Apache that might be using OpenSSL under the hood.

We will continue to be on the lookout, and keep you informed if any new information arises.

Avatar of marc

by marc

Data Abstract, RemObjects SDK and Hydra “Spring 2014” Releases

March 31, 2014 in .NET, Cocoa, Data Abstract, Delphi, Hydra, Java

On Friday, we released the latest updates to our Data Abstract and RemObjects SDK products for all five platforms, as well as for Hydra. Like always, a whole bunch of fixes and improvements across the product lines are gathered together in this release.

For Data Abstract and RemObjects SDK, this is also our last planned release for the 7.0 product version, as we prepare for a major new product cycle — codenamed DA8 — starting with our summer release in May. As such, this update focuses mainly on bug fixes and smaller enhancements (of which there are many).

The new release also includes official support for use with our recently released RemObjects C#, including project templates and IDE improvements to let you build .NET, Cocoa and Java apps with RO/DA using our C# implementation, as well as building managed hosts and plugins for Hydra.

As always, the new update is free for all users with an active subscription, and available on the customer portal. Our free 30-day trial downloads have also been updated to the new version.

If your subscription has elapsed, then now is a great time to renew. Renewing will not only give you access to the new 7.0 update, but also access to the beta versions of DA8 that will become available over the course of April, as well as the first (and future) DA8 or RO8 releases throughout the year.

If your previous subscription ended a while ago, you will be happy to hear that we recently updated our online shop to automatically grant “amnesty renewals”. That means you can be assured that your renewed license will always cover the current product and at least six months of future updates from your renewal date.

If you have or are considering getting a Suite subscription, remember that the Suites for .NET, Cocoa and Java now also include RemObjects C# — so you get been more value at the same great price as before (and you can always up-renew from RO or DA to the Suite, of course).

But enough talk, i’m sure you’re anxious to try out the new bits. We’re happy to have this new set of updates out to you now, and we’re extremely excited about what we have coming for DA8 and RO8 this summer and beyond.

yours,
marc hoffman
Chief Architect

Avatar of marc

by marc

Using iOS 7.1 SDK with RemObjects C# or Oxygene

March 11, 2014 in Elements, Nougat

As you’ve probably seen, iOS 7.1 is out — and with it, a new SDK. Anxious to use iOS 7.1 with RemObjects C# or Oxygene? No problem. our Importing a New or Beta SDK for Use with Elements for Cocoa article on the wiki explains how to do it:

Launch FXGen by right-clicking CrossBox:

Once you have downloaded/updated to Xcode 5.1 from the App Store, find the Xcode.app in in your /Applications folder and drag it into the app:

Select iOS 7.1 from the dropdown:

Click “Start Import”

FXGen will run a for a short while, and then you have .fx files for the iOS 7.1 SDK you can use. Just copy them to the “C:\Program Files (x86)\RemObjects Software\Elements\Nougat\SDKs” folder in your PC or VM, and you’re off running.

Of course these same steps will also work for importing beta SDKs (which we won’t be able to tell you about, because of NDAs) – for example when Apple starts seeing iOS 8.0 or the next version of OS X later this year. This way, you can start working with the cool new stuff right away — without having to wait for anyone to create wrappers for you.

It goes without saying that now that iOS 7.1 is officially out, our next release (and Friday’s upcoming beta) will include the .fx files for iOS 7.1 out of the box.

Enjoy,
marc

Avatar of marc

by marc

Announcing Elements: Oxygene 7 and RemObjects C#

March 2, 2014 in Uncategorized

Dear readers,

we’ve shipped some pretty significant releases this past weekend that i wanted to take a moment to talk to and update you about.

First, and probably most interesting to our existing users, we shipped version 7 of Oxygene. This is a pretty significant new release of our Oxygene language and toolchain, with many cool new features that we are very excited about. As always, you can find an overview of What’s New and a Full Change Log on our website, but i also want to go into some of the improvements in more detail.

Most exciting to me, personally, is the introduction of LINQ for the Cocoa and Java platforms. LINQ has always been one of the modern language features on .NET that i found really helpful, because it brings a clean structured way to working with filtering, sorting and otherwise manipulating lists of objects — in a type-save manner. With Oxygene 7, this feature, and most standard LINQ query operations, are now available across all three platforms. This means that you can now use LINQ syntax to sort or filter NSArrays on Cocoa for example.

One example i saw mentioned just yesterday that i would never have thought of is to use LINQ to find a particular view in your Cocoa app:

var wideView := (from v in view.subViews where v.frame.width > 300).FirstOrDefault

As you can see, LINQ is useful in many areas, not just when working with what we traditionally think of as “data”.

But LINQ is not the only item where we have updated the language to bring the platforms closer together. Multi-part method names, originally introduced because “we kinda needed them” for Cocoa are now available on all platforms. Many of you (and many of us) really liked this feature as a regular language syntax, and we saw no reason to hold it back to be Cocoa-only — so you can now write expressive and readable APIs for your classes, regardless of platform. We’ve also unified support for Iterators, the notify keyword and anonymous classes across all platforms, and added a bunch of standard attributes commonly used on .NET across platforms, via Aspects.

If you read between the lines, you gather that cross-platform is a big theme for this release, so we’ve also added a new Cross-Platform Compatibility Mode to the compiler. By default, Oxygene is strict about platform differences — when you write code for .NET, it tries to be a good .NET citizen; if you write for for Android, it is a good Java citizen instead. Turning on the Cross-Platform Compatibility Mode option (which can be done per-project or per-file), this dynamic changes. The compiler will be more lenient, and let it slide if you use a syntax feature needed on one platform, but not on the other. For example, you might want to mark a file as weak for Cocoa, and the compiler will simply ignore that keyword on .NET. The compiler will also be more helpful in letting you know when you write code that won’t be cross-platform. This way, when you’re set to build for .NET and write shared code, you’ll get early warnings if a language feature you are using might be problematic on Cocoa or Java, for example.

Finally, there’s the big one: Sugar. Sugar has been in the works for a while, and finally is being included as “version 1.0” officially in this release. What is Sugar? Sugar is a library of cross-platform classes that you can use on your code, so that you can share it across all three platforms. All three platform — .NET, Cocoa and Java — provide their own versions of basic types, from strings over dictionaries to XML processing, HTTP requests or file system access. Code that uses those APIs will often be platform-specific, without needing to be. Sugar provides a way to write base “business logic” code for your applications that can be easily shared between different platforms — for example if you are writing the same app for iOS, Android and Windows Phone. And it does this in a smart way (using mapped classes under the hood) that comes with no runtime overhead, even when crossing from platform-specific code into shared code and back.

These are the four whoppers, but there’s a lot more good stuff in Oxygene 7 that we think you’ll love. And as always, Oxygene 7 is of course a free update to all users with an active subscription.

But that’s not all!

Introducing RemObjects C#

In addition, we’ve also shipped a brand new product based on the same tool chain as Oxygene — a sister project to Oxygene, so to speak, and that product is called RemObjects C#.

You may have heard us talk or hint about RemObjects C# before under the code name “Hydrogene”, and that code name really illustrates well what RemObjects C# is in relation to Oxygene: It’s an implementation of the C# language for Cocoa, Java (and of course .NET), based on all the principles that make Oxygene great. In essence it is “Oxygene for people who’d rather use C#”.

RemObjects C# has all the things that make Oxygene great — a unified language and tool set that allows you to compile for the .NET CLR, for the Java JVM and for Cocoa’s Objective-C Runtime. It has the same great editor features — from our inline errors to Fix-Its. It has our Visual-Studio integrated debugging support for Java and Cocoa. It uses our CrossBox toolchain for deploying, running and debugging your applications on your Mac, your iOS or Android devices or the emulators/simulators right from Visual Studio. The only thing that’s different is the language itself.

RemObjects C# is a 100% true and ECMA—spec conform implementation of the C# language that millions of developers already use to build .NET apps. Except — like its sister product Oxygene — that language is now available to target the other development platforms as well.

Leaving the language aside, Oxygene and RemObjects C# will, from now on, evolve in parity, because they use all the same technologies under the hood (including even the most parts of compiler, except for the language front-end). So RemObjects C#, despite being a brand new product, immediately builds upon over a decade of experience and work that went into the underlying toolchain. And moving forward, 90% of the work we invest in the product will benefit both languages.

Which Language to Choose?

We approach the development of the two languages slightly different and that might influence that decision.

Oxygene has always been “our” language. Ever since we started off in 2003 with a language that already then provided vast improvements over the “standard” Object Pascal implementation in Delphi, we’ve been driving and improving Oxygene aggressively. As a result, Oxygene is one of the most powerful, versatile and expressive mainstream development languages out there today. And we will continue in that fashion — Oxygene will evolve, and get better and better

C# is a language designed by Microsoft, and well-defined in an ECMA specification. For our implementation, we tried to stay as close to that specification as we could (and only extend it in clean, tasteful and spec-conform ways, where really necessary). We will continue developing RemObjects C# in that fashion — we will evolve it as the official C# language evolves, but we will not be adding our own language features to it, just because we think they’d be neat language features. We feel that C# is not ours to evolve.

So if you’re already die-hard Oxygene (or Pascal) fan, and you want a language that’s advancing quickly and embracing new language features that enhance your development experience often, you will most likely want to stick (or start with) Oxygene. If you’re already a C# developer (or generally prefer other C-based languages) and/or not a big fan of Pascal, then RemObjects C# is the language for you.

Of course you don’t necessarily have to choose at all. You can use Oxygene and RemObject C# together. In fact, because both languages are built on the same back-end compiler, you can even use them together in the same project.

Ways to get Oxygene or RemObjects C#

As already mentioned, Oxygene is of course a free update, if your subscription is active as of March 1 — and if it’s not, now is as good a time to renew as ever.

Similarly, RemObjects C# is of course available at no extra charge to all customers with an active Suite subscription for the appropriate platforms (i.e. .NET, Cocoa or Java). If you’re a Suite subscriber, you should see new “Elements” SKUs for download on your licensed downloads page — these will install both Oxygene and RemObjects C#.

We also have the following purchasing options available.

For new users:

  • Oxygene is available at $699 per user, including all platforms — same as it has always been.
  • RemObjects C# is also available at $699 per user, including all platforms — in other words: same as Oxygene, just a different language.
  • The bundle of Oxygene and RemObjects C# is available at $999 per user, including all three platforms and both languages.

For current Oxygene users:

  • If your Oxygene subscription expired, or expires soon, you can renew at $499 for another year of upgrades to Oxygene.
  • If you want to add RemObjects C# to the mix, you can renew both for $699. Only $200 extra, and you get a whole new language — we think that’s a pretty sweet deal. Also, both Oxygene and RemObjects C# will get the same new renewal date — so if your current Oxygene subscription is still good for a while, that’s an extra benefit for renewing early.
  • Finally, if you just want to add RemObjects C# to your existing Oxygene license (and with the same renewal date), you can do that for just $399 (but really, the previous item at $699 is the better value, no matter your current subscription status).

The first two of thee options are also available to all customers of Prism XE3 or later, who currently enjoy a complimentary license extension to Oxygene for .NET from us as part of their SA coverage.

We’ve also recently made two adjustments to our online store (which also has been completely revamped and improved) that might benefit you:

First, if your subscription has expired more than 6 months ago, the store will now automatically apply what we call “amnesty renewal” when you purchase a renewal. Amnesty renewal makes sure that you always get at least the current release and six months of free updates from the purchase date. This holds true even if your previous subscription expired years ago.

Second, we’ve improved our volume discount program, so that you now start saving on multi-user license purchases for as little as 2 users. Volume discounts start at 5% (for two to five users) but can go all the way up to 30%. Our shop will handle all of that for you automatically.

That’s it for now

I think that’s it, for now (probably more than enough, wouldn’t you say? ;).

As you can probably tell, we are very excited by this new release — both with the new features added to Oxygene 7 (which, i should have mentioned, are all available to RemObject C# as well) as well as the brand new RemObjects C#.

We hope you enjoy them, too — and that if you’re not already a customer, you’ll grab the free 30-day trial and take the products for a spin. (It goes without saying that the RemObjects C# trial works well alongside your licensed copy of Oxygene as well.)

Oh, and last but not least: Scotty has created an awesome set of Getting Started videos for RemObjects C# (and similar videos for Oxygene are coming soon). Make sure to check them out!

Yours,
marc hoffman
Chief Architect

Avatar of marc

by marc

Announcing the Oxygene “January 2014″ Update

February 5, 2014 in Elements

Ahh, it feels like forever since i have written one of these, with the holidays and a long-overdue vacation in January. But it’s really just been a little over six weeks, and the time has come again:

Last friday, we shipped the latest update for Oxygene. The January 2014 release is a minor bugfix release for our 6.x compiler line, versioned as 6.1.61.1441. While it contains no major new features over what we shipped in November, it does have a wide range of fixes across all areas of the product, and is a recommended update for all users (of course ;)).

January 2014 also marks the last update for our 6.0 compiler line, and with that, the last release with Oxygene standing alone. We’re hard at work to finalize “Elements 7.0”, our next major release coming around the end of February – and with that release, not only does Oxygene get a major version bump again, it will also gain a sibling: our new Hydrogene language (which we’ll start talking a lot more about over the next few weeks).

But first things first: The January 2014 release is of course, as always, a free update for all users with an active subscription. You can find it for download in your Licensed Downloads area, as well as on the public Trials page. It (optionally) includes the still-new Visual Studio 2013 IDE.

If your subscription has lapsed, there has never been a better time to renew than now to get both the new release and everything we have planned for the next year (and beyond). As always, you can renew your Oxygene license for a mere $499 per user. And we also have a special “up-renewal” that lets you renew Oxygene and add Hydrogene, for only $699.

If you’re a Prism user, abandoned by Embarcadero, chances are you might be entitled to extended Oxygene for .NET releases from us. Check our Prism FAQ for details, or contact us if you have questions.

January 2014 is a great release – and we’re even more excited about what we have in store for you for the rest of the year. Let us know what you think!

Enjoy!

Avatar of marc

by marc

Reminder: Get Oxygene for .NET as part of your RAD Studio SA

November 20, 2013 in Elements, Oxygene

Hi.

i just wanted to shoot out a reminder that if you purchased “Support & Maintenance”, a.k.a Software Assurance (SA) for RAD Studio XE3 from Embarcadero, you are entitled to updated releases of Oxygene for .NET for the duration of your SA period.

Embarcadero might be telling you (if they say anything at all, that is) that Prism is discontinued or dead, but nothing could be further from the truth.

Prism has always been just a rebranded version of our Oxygene for .NET product. And while Embarcadero might no longer be delivering it to you (in spite of happily taking your SA money), Oxygene is alive and well, of course, and we here at RemObjects have decided to honor the full SA periods and provide you with the latest updates to Oxygene for .NET for the duration of your SA period – on our own dime.

What do you need to do?

Two simple things:

  1. Register an existing XE3.2 (or XE3.1 or XE3, if you never received the others) serial number with us at remobjects.com/oxygene/registerserial.
  2. Contact us at sales@remobjects.com with details about your SA contract, most importantly its coverage period, and (if not obvious from your name or email address) the username you created in Step 1.

We’ll update your account with access to the latest release of Oxygene for .NET covered by your SA period (which may include future releases, too), and get back to you, ASAP.

Caveats

As i mentioned above, we’re doing this on our own dime, so we need to set some cut-off date, or else we’d be shipping free Oxygene to everyone, forever, and not be able to pay our salaries.

Our official cut-off date for the above offer is April 23, 2013. On that date, Embarcadero announced RAD Studio XE4, which officially no longer included Prism.

If you purchased RAD Studio XE3 with DA, or renewed SA for RAD Studio before that date, you qualify for the above deal. If you renewed after this date, your previous SA period has already been fully covered, and your new SA period is for XE4 and does not, i’m sorry to say, include Prism anymore.

That said, if you purchased or renewed RAD Studio SA after the above-mentions date and feel in any way that you were misled or that the lack of Prism in your new purchase was mis-represented (and i’m only bringing this scenario up because we had countless people contact us with that exact concern), please email us anyway, and we will try and find a fair solution.

Our #1 goal is that every Prism customer gets a fair deal and does not feel cheated out of the product they paid for.

Full Oxygene

If you don’t have SA, or your SA has expired, of course there’s always the option (and we’ll love you for it) of just going and renewing to the full Oxygene product from us.

Not only does this give you a fresh year of updates to Oxygene for .NET, but it also gives you access to the other two platform editions, letting you build fully native no-compromise apps for iOS, Mac, Android and Java.

And if your SA is still active (and/or extended via the above offer), renewing will add an extra year on top of your current SA period – essentially giving you more than a year of updates for all three platforms.

  • If you have an extended license with us: Renew for $499 to add a year of Oxygene for .NET, Cocoa and Java, on top.
  • If you don’t have a current/non-expired subscription: Cross-grade for $599 for a fresh year of updates.(You can also cross-grade if you own any version of Delphi or any past version of Prism.)

In Summary

We’re very excited about Oxygene, what we have done with it over the past year, and what we have planned moving forward. We’re also very thankful for your patronage, and we hope that you love working in Oxygene as much as we do (and as much as we love creating it), and we look forward to what 2014 will bring, with you on board.


Party Time!

Avatar of marc

by marc

Announcing the Oxygene “October 2013″ Update

November 4, 2013 in Elements, iOS, Nougat

Dear readers,

we may be a day late and into November with this announcement, but we’d like you to know that the “October 2013″ update for Oxygene has been made available earlier this week.

What’s New

The October update is mostly a bug-fix release, but it also includes a couple of rather significant new features on the Cocoa front.

Most importantly, this release officially introduced 64-bit ARM support for the Apple A7 chip in the new iPhone 5S and the new iPads that came out today. Last month we laid a lot of the groundwork with 64-bit compiler support, but now [you can build](http://wiki.oxygenelanguage.com/en/Architectures_(Cocoa) your apps for your devices in 64-bit mode, as well. Very exciting.

We have also started officially shipping .fx files for the new Mac OS X 10.9 “Mavericks”, and we’ve extended the Cocoa compiler to support the new “instancetype” feature introduced/mainstreamed for Objective-C by the iOS 7 and OS X Mavericks SDK.

And of course there are a good 100 additional fixes and improvements in this update, across all three platforms.

How to get Oxygene 6.1.57

As always, this release is a free update to all active subscribers, and can be downloaded now.

If your subscription has elapsed, now is a great time to renew to get access to the latest release and all the good stuff we have cooking for the near future.

Oxygene for Prism Customers

Remember that Oxygene 6.1 is also the first release that is no longer available from Embarcadero under the Prism brand, and it will not accept Prism XE3.2 serial numbers. But as a reminder: we are committed to honoring SA contracts Embarcadero might have sold you with the promise of Prism coverage (i.e. before April 23, 2013). Please email sales@remobjects.com with your SA details, and we’ll sort you out with ongoing access to Oxygene for .NET for the remainder of your SA period. (You can read more about this here).

Of course, if you do not have SA, or if you want to take advantage of Oxygene on the Cocoa and Java/Android platforms as well, you can always renew or cross-grade to the full Oxygene package at any time.

More to Come

2013 is drawing to a close, but we’re not done yet. We’ve got one whopper of a release planned for the end of this month (and lots of cool stuff are coming in 2014 as well). So make sure stay up to date with your subscription.

Happy coding!

Avatar of marc

by marc

“Steps” for iPhone 5S — written in Oxygene

October 30, 2013 in Elements, iOS, non-tech, Nougat


Steps

I’m more than thrilled to let you know about “Steps“, my next/new iOS app.

Steps is a small but helpful app, which works exclusively for the new iPhone 5S, because it uses the new M7 chip that Apple has introduced with the 5S to gather motion data and let you know how many steps you are taking each day.

Whether you’re interested in that to keep track of your daily workout, or just want a fun way to explore this cool new feature of your iPhone — Steps is a great way to do it.

On first launch, Steps gathers up to 7 days of previous walking history. That’s right — Steps (or rather, the M7 chip ;) has been hard at work for you even before you bought it! So you have some data to look at immediately.

In addition to showing your daily step count, Steps (new in version 1.1) also aggregates your average daily steps for the past week and month, and it will keep track of what your personal best has been, so far — including encouragement to beat it, when you get close.

Over time, and without you ever having to think about it again, Steps will update to load in more data as you roam about, all the while keeping track of your past history. Eventually, you’ll have months and months of walking data to look at. You don’t need to launch Steps manually for this to happen (although you will want to launch it to have a look once in a while).

And because it uses the new M7 chip, Steps can do all of this without affecting your iPhone’s battery life at all.

 

It goes without saying that Steps is written 100% in Oxygene for Cocoa. And as with all my previous Oxygene iOS projects, full source code is available on GitHub at github.com/dwarfland/Steps.

So, if you have your iPhone 5S yet, make sure to grab your copy of Steps on the App Store, for only 99c. And if you’re a developer, make sure to check out the code, as well!




Originally published on subspacecables.com.

Avatar of marc

by marc

Visual Studio 2013 is here (for some values of “here”)

October 22, 2013 in Data Abstract, Elements, Visual Studio

The time has come, and Visual Studio 2013 is officially RTMed and available on MSDN, even though the official launch event is not scheduled until November 13th.

What does Visual Studio 2013 mean for our users?

Oxygene has been ready for Visual Studio 2013 for a while now (and i personally have been using 2013 exclusively ever since i redid my development VMs earlier this year and when VS2013 was still a private CTP we weren’t allowed to talk about). Visual Studio 2013 support for Oxygene made it into our public releases back in August, and our latest September 2013 update is fully ready for the RTM version of Visual Studio 2013. SO if you have an MSDN subscription, you can download your copy now, run the latest Oxygene installer, and you’ll get the full Oxygene experience in the fresh new IDE.

We’ll be rolling out the Visual Studio 2013 Shell with Oxygene in our upcoming (major!) November 2013 release. (We got one more release coming up before, the incremental October 2013 update, but that had been locked down before the RTM was available, and also we’ve been asked to hold of shipping the 2013 Shell until after the official launch event. ;).

Data Abstract and RemObjects SDK also have been made ready for Visual Studio 2013 with the last update we shipped in September. This applies to the .NET editions, Data Abstract for JavaScript and also – if you are using Oxygene – the editions for Java and Cocoa. We’ll be doing more testing with the RTM release, and the next update might include additional tweaks and improvements to round this off.

 

Avatar of marc

by marc

Come See Brian Long Talk about Android Development with Oxygene at BE-Delphi

October 7, 2013 in Events, non-tech

I’m told that our friend Brian Long will be giving a presentation at BE-Delphi’s annual developer event in Antwerp, Belgium, on November 21.

Brian is a great presenter; we had the pleasure of having him as a guest speaker at DSConf and he has presented on Oxygene for Android and iOS in the past — so if you’re anywhere near Antwerp in November, make sure to check out his talk, and the conference in general.

From Brian’s session summary:

Oxygene is an Object-Pascal based language previously well know in its .NET incarnation as Delphi Prism. Oxygene for Java produces Android apps that run where Android does – in Android’s Dalvik VM. It is for those who have a background in Delphi or a history of Pascal programming from previous times, or anyone who fancies something a bit different from Java, and who wants to use the standard Android APIs in the Android SDK to build lightweight, standard Android applications (or, for that matter, Java applets, servlets, etc.) that can run on any Android device of your choosing.

We’ll look at Oxygene for Java’s capabilities and features in the context of building and deploying an Android application using OS-native controls. We’ll see how the product works, bump into some enhancements to the evolving Object Pascal language and show that Oxygene for Java is a first class citizen in the world of Android development.

You can find out more about BE-Delphi at be-delphi.com.